“We had come back with the idea of starting in where we had left off and carrying on from there. Unfortunately, the place we had left off wasn’t there anymore. We were in a new Canada, and we didn’t know our way around, and we didn’t know whether we liked it or not.”

Norman James, Veteran

Veteran issues

“Welcome to Our Boys”

In 1919, the Canadian government put in place many initiatives to help the ex-soldiers’ return: Canada provided better pensions, training, medical treatment and grants than any other country involved in the First World War.

Despite this ambitious program, returning to a debt-ridden country, where jobs were scarce and the Spanish Flu was raging, was no easy task. After all their sacrifices, many veterans felt entitled to better government protection, and fought for it during the interwar period.

Veterans’ associations

Hover to flip to the back
Veterans’ associations for ex-soldiers of the Great War grew across the country as early as 1915 and served a dual purpose: commemoration and lobbying for improvement to veterans’ services and status.

The 1919 Bonus Campaign

Hover to flip to the back
The 1919 Bonus Campaign, which sought a $2000 bonus for all veterans, was endorsed by numerous veterans’ associations across the country. For the Union government, the bonus was another expense in a budget already suffering from a major deficit and despite extensive campaigning by veterans organisations, the bonus was not put in place.

Access to Pensions

Hover to flip to the back
By 1920, more than 177,000 disabled veterans, or widows and children of deceased soldiers, were receiving pensions from the government. Despite the impressive scale of this program, access to pensions was strict. Many requests from individuals suffering from the physical and psychological effects of shell shock and gassing were denied under the pretext that these illnesses were not attributable to war service. During the 1930s, veterans challenged these decisions, sometimes winning small grants or pensions.

Yearly Pension

Pensions varied according to the nature of the wound, the rank of the veteran, and the number of depends. Today a yearly $480 pension would amount to a little bit more than $6,400.

Loss of 2 eyes, legs or hands

Maximum pension
$ 480 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Loss of 1 eye, leg or hand

Maximum pension
$ 288 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Welcome for returning veterans, [1919?]

City of Toronto Archives
William James Family Fonds (1244)
Item 902

“Welcome to Our Boys”

Veteran Issues

In 1919, the Canadian government put in place many initiatives to help the ex-soldiers’ return: Canada provided better pensions, training, medical treatment and grants than any other country involved in the First World War.

Despite this ambitious program, returning to a debt-ridden country, where jobs were scarce and the Spanish Flu was raging, was no easy task. After all their sacrifices, many veterans felt entitled to better government protection, and fought for it during the interwar period.

Veterans’ associations

Hover to flip to the back
Veterans’ associations for ex-soldiers of the Great War grew across the country as early as 1915 and served a dual purpose: commemoration and lobbying for improvement to veterans’ services and status.

The 1919 Bonus Campaign

Hover to flip to the back
The 1919 Bonus Campaign, which sought a $2000 bonus for all veterans, was endorsed by numerous veterans’ associations across the country. For the Union government, the bonus was another expense in a budget already suffering from a major deficit and despite extensive campaigning by veterans organisations, the bonus was not put in place.

Access to Pensions

Hover to flip to the back
By 1920, more than 177,000 disabled veterans, or widows and children of deceased soldiers, were receiving pensions from the government. Despite the impressive scale of this program, access to pensions was strict. Many requests from individuals suffering from the physical and psychological effects of shell shock and gassing were denied under the pretext that these illnesses were not attributable to war service. During the 1930s, veterans challenged these decisions, sometimes winning small grants or pensions.

Yearly Pension

Pensions varied according to the nature of the wound, the rank of the veteran, and the number of depends. Today a yearly $480 pension would amount to a little bit more than $6,400.

Loss of 2 eyes, legs or hands

Maximum pension
$ 480 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Loss of 1 eye, leg or hand

Maximum pension
$ 288 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Welcome for returning veterans, [1919?]

City of Toronto Archives
William James Family Fonds (1244)
Item 902

Veteran Issues

Add Your Heading Text Here

In 1919, the Canadian government put in place many initiatives to help the ex-soldiers’ return: Canada provided better pensions, training, medical treatment and grants than any other country involved in the First World War.

Despite this ambitious program, returning to a debt-ridden country, where jobs were scarce and the Spanish Flu was raging, was no easy task. After all their sacrifices, many veterans felt entitled to better government protection, and fought for it during the interwar period.

Veterans’ associations

Hover to flip to the back
Veterans’ associations for ex-soldiers of the Great War grew across the country as early as 1915 and served a dual purpose: commemoration and lobbying for improvement to veterans’ services and status.

The 1919 Bonus Campaign

Hover to flip to the back
The 1919 Bonus Campaign, which sought a $2000 bonus for all veterans, was endorsed by numerous veterans’ associations across the country. For the Union government, the bonus was another expense in a budget already suffering from a major deficit and despite extensive campaigning by veterans organisations, the bonus was not put in place.

Access to Pensions

Hover to flip to the back
By 1920, more than 177,000 disabled veterans, or widows and children of deceased soldiers, were receiving pensions from the government. Despite the impressive scale of this program, access to pensions was strict. Many requests from individuals suffering from the physical and psychological effects of shell shock and gassing were denied under the pretext that these illnesses were not attributable to war service. During the 1930s, veterans challenged these decisions, sometimes winning small grants or pensions.

Yearly Pension

Pensions varied according to the nature of the wound, the rank of the veteran, and the number of depends. Today a yearly $480 pension would amount to a little bit more than $6,400.

Loss of 2 eyes, legs or hands

Maximum pension
$ 480 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Loss of 1 eye, leg or hand

Maximum pension
$ 288 Yearly
  • With additional $72 per dependent

Welcome for returning veterans, [1919?]

City of Toronto Archives
William James Family Fonds (1244)
Item 902