Travelling Exhibition: After the War

The First World War not only devastated Europe, but also the dominions, colonies, and countries abroad who took part in the conflict. With more than 60 000 Canadians killed, billions of dollars spent, and life-long physical and mental scarring, the war’s ramifications extended well beyond the battlefields.

Our new travelling exhibition After the War: Coming Home and Fitting in at the End of the Great War looks at the efforts made by Canadian society to provide support to over 600 000 members of their population as they contended with the challenges of reintegration into a society that, in many ways, did not resemble the one they left in 1914. In considering issues of demobilization, community organizations and activism, injuries and disabilities, government support, and the cost of war in the post-war years, this exhibition and its accompanying catalogue provides valuable insight into the daunting task that faced Canadians in the aftermath of the war.

After the War will be travelling across Canada in 2019 with its first stop in Calgary at Lougheed House from 24 January to 15 March. From there, it will travel to Winnipeg Public Library with further stops across Canada until it returns to Montreal for November 2019. Continue following us to learn if the exhibition will be stopping in a city near you.

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“Christmas in Canada as Usual”: Celebrating on the Home Front

Earlier this week, we shared an episode from the Imperial War Museum’s Voices of the First World War series that looked at the various ways Christmas was experienced during conflict. While we are often reminded of how Christmas was celebrated on the Western Front, perhaps most famously through the Christmas truce of 1914, we are less familiar with the way Christmas was experienced on the home front from 1914 to 1918. Christmas on the home front may have been more comfortable in many ways, but civilians were still feeling the impact of the war and absent loved ones left little to celebrate during the holidays. Continue reading ““Christmas in Canada as Usual”: Celebrating on the Home Front”