“You are needed”: Americans in the Canadian Expeditionary Force

The summer of 2017 marks 100 years since the arrival of the first American troops in France. The American Expeditionary Force landed on 26 June 1917, with 14 000 soldiers, a force which eventually grew to about 2 million. However, before the United States joined the war, there were still thousands of Americans fighting in Europe; over 40 000 of those fought with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Continue reading ““You are needed”: Americans in the Canadian Expeditionary Force”

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On the Somme: Royal Ewing and the 42nd Battalion

[Royal Lindsay Hamilton Ewing, no date] Ewing Fonds. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2015.04.24.01
[Royal Lindsay Hamilton Ewing, no date] Ewing Fonds. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2015.04.24.01
The Canadian Corps was not involved in the British army’s disastrous first day on the Somme, on 1 July 1916, but had spent the summer of 1916 training, resupplying, and integrating the new recruits transferred to the front line to fill the gaps left by the almost 9 000 casualties suffered by the Corps in the spring at Mont Sorrel. Haig sent the Corps to relieved the 1st Australian Corps at Pozières on 1 September; two weeks later the 2nd and 3rd Divisions would fight doggedly for the village of Courcelette, their first introduction to the exhausting fighting on the Somme.  Continue reading “On the Somme: Royal Ewing and the 42nd Battalion”