Valenciennes and the Pursuit of the German Army

Following the allied victory at Cambrai, the Germans continued their retreat and made their final stand at Valenciennes. With the Canal de l’Escaut to their west and Mount Houy to their south, Valenciennes offered a strong natural defensive landscape where the Germans could slow their enemy’s advance. This would be where the Canadians would fight their last final battle before the armistice.   Continue reading “Valenciennes and the Pursuit of the German Army”

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“A suicide job”: Lt. Walter Ritchie Clarke at the Canal de l’Escaut, October 1918

"Fredericton Officers Who are Returing with 26th Battalion ", The Daily Gleaner, Friday, May 16, 1919. [Fredericton, NB]. Collections CCGW/CCGG.
“Fredericton Officers Who are Returing with 26th Battalion “, The Daily Gleaner, Friday, May 16, 1919. [Fredericton, NB]. Collections CCGW/CCGG.
Walter Ritchie Clarke had been in the militia since he was 13, when he joined the York Regiment in New Brunswick as a bugler in 1905. By the time of his enlistment with the CEF in 1916, Clarke was married with a daughter, and had been serving as an orderly room sergeant for the first two years of the war. He came directly into the CEF as an officer and was soon sent overseas with a draft of men meant for New Brunswick’s frontline battalion, the Fighting 26thContinue reading ““A suicide job”: Lt. Walter Ritchie Clarke at the Canal de l’Escaut, October 1918”