The Canadians and the Fall of Cambrai

Following their success at the Canal du Nord, the Canadian Corps could now turn their attention to Cambrai. Situated in the Nord-Pas de Calais region, Cambrai was a key logistical centre that was surrounded by an elaborate network of canals. The area was heavily occupied by a retreating German army who showed no signs of slowing their resistance. Continue reading “The Canadians and the Fall of Cambrai”

Advertisements

“A suicide job”: Lt. Walter Ritchie Clarke at the Canal de l’Escaut, October 1918

"Fredericton Officers Who are Returing with 26th Battalion ", The Daily Gleaner, Friday, May 16, 1919. [Fredericton, NB]. Collections CCGW/CCGG.
“Fredericton Officers Who are Returing with 26th Battalion “, The Daily Gleaner, Friday, May 16, 1919. [Fredericton, NB]. Collections CCGW/CCGG.
Walter Ritchie Clarke had been in the militia since he was 13, when he joined the York Regiment in New Brunswick as a bugler in 1905. By the time of his enlistment with the CEF in 1916, Clarke was married with a daughter, and had been serving as an orderly room sergeant for the first two years of the war. He came directly into the CEF as an officer and was soon sent overseas with a draft of men meant for New Brunswick’s frontline battalion, the Fighting 26thContinue reading ““A suicide job”: Lt. Walter Ritchie Clarke at the Canal de l’Escaut, October 1918”