“Some photographs from Somewhere in France”: The Great War photo-postcard

[Unknown Canadian infantry unit ]" T. McBryde, W. Bolicut, G. Fear, "Me" H. Tucker, "Old Bob", J. Morris, "Jeff"|France June 17/16 George" [Studio unknown] 1916. Collections CCGW/CCGG
[Unknown Canadian infantry unit ]” T. McBryde, W. Bolicut, G. Fear, “Me” H. Tucker, “Old Bob”, J. Morris, “Jeff”|France June 17/16 George”. R. Guilleminot, Boespflug et Cie – Paris. 1916. Collections CCGW/CCGG
I have written about amateur photography during the First World War elsewhere on this blog (see here), but in light of the Centre’s forthcoming fundraising drive next week, to raise 5 000$ for the digitisation of our photograph collection, I thought that I would write about another element of the Great War’s photographic record – the photo-postcard.  Continue reading ““Some photographs from Somewhere in France”: The Great War photo-postcard”

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A man and his camera: William Barker’s First World War snapshots

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The portable camera revolutionised the act of photography, taking it from the hands of studio professionals like Montréal’s famous Notman Studio and allowing the average person to take snapshots, documenting the events of their life. Marketed for the first time in 1888 by George Eastman, and perfected by him as the Kodak Brownie camera in 1900, the simplified camera would find its way to the front also, despite the rules surrounding photography. In the hand of civilian soldiers like William James Barker, the Brownie camera would be used to show scenes of the soldiering life, providing visual evidence of their time at war.  Continue reading “A man and his camera: William Barker’s First World War snapshots”