“Suitable Memorials”: The War Sculptures of Frances Loring

Frances Loring, [no date]. Image courtesy Exhibition Place, Toronto.
Frances Loring, [no date]. Image courtesy Exhibition Place, Toronto.
While doing research for another project on the war memorial in St Stephen, New Brunswick, I stumbled across the name of the artist who sculpted the bronze statuette that topped the monument; Frances Loring. Intrigued, I started to look further into this mysterious person, and stumbled upon one of the pre-eminent Canadian sculptors of the early 20th century.  Continue reading ““Suitable Memorials”: The War Sculptures of Frances Loring”

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Waiting behind: Canadian mothers, wives and families during World War I

[Canadian Service Flag], 1917. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2014.01.24.01
[Canadian Service Flag], 1917. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2014.01.24.01
The First World War produced an enormous amount of documentary evidence of the typical soldier’s experience at the front, in the form of letters, diaries, and after the war, the many memoirs that were published. An experience that is harder to pin down was that of the family members left behind, who had to continue their day to day lives with the knowledge that one of their own was in danger far away. Vera Brittain describes the agony of waiting for news and “the long, long weary months ahead, & wonder[ing] how I shall ever bear them…” (Berry and Bostridge, Vera Brittain: A life,74). For those waiting at home, the war would be many long, weary months.  Continue reading “Waiting behind: Canadian mothers, wives and families during World War I”