The Paris Peace Conference, 1919

One hundred years ago, delegates of the victorious Allied nations arrived in France at the Paris Peace Conference. In the following six months, they would take part in some of the most critical negotiations and decisions to reestablish peace and a new international order. With nearly 61 000 war dead, Prime Minister Sir Robert Borden argued that Canada had earned her separate representation at the peace conference and the Dominion was given two seats in the negotiations that would lead to the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. [1]

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Travelling Exhibition: After the War

The First World War not only devastated Europe, but also the dominions, colonies, and countries abroad who took part in the conflict. With more than 60 000 Canadians killed, billions of dollars spent, and life-long physical and mental scarring, the war’s ramifications extended well beyond the battlefields.

Our new travelling exhibition After the War: Coming Home and Fitting in at the End of the Great War looks at the efforts made by Canadian society to provide support to over 600 000 members of their population as they contended with the challenges of reintegration into a society that, in many ways, did not resemble the one they left in 1914. In considering issues of demobilization, community organizations and activism, injuries and disabilities, government support, and the cost of war in the post-war years, this exhibition and its accompanying catalogue provides valuable insight into the daunting task that faced Canadians in the aftermath of the war.

After the War will be travelling across Canada in 2019 with its first stop in Calgary at Lougheed House from 24 January to 15 March. From there, it will travel to Winnipeg Public Library with further stops across Canada until it returns to Montreal for November 2019. Continue following us to learn if the exhibition will be stopping in a city near you.

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