“You are needed”: Americans in the Canadian Expeditionary Force

The summer of 2017 marks 100 years since the arrival of the first American troops in France. The American Expeditionary Force landed on 26 June 1917, with 14 000 soldiers, a force which eventually grew to about 2 million. However, before the United States joined the war, there were still thousands of Americans fighting in Europe; over 40 000 of those fought with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Continue reading ““You are needed”: Americans in the Canadian Expeditionary Force”

The world at war: Canada’s multi-origin CEF

Elders and Indian soldiers in the uniform of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, [ca. 1916-17] [original title] Library and Archives Canada / PA-041366
Elders and Indian soldiers in the uniform of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, [ca. 1916-17] [original title] Library and Archives Canada / PA-041366
Having just finished reading  David Olusoga’s excellent study of non-white soldiers during the First World War The World’s war: Forgotten soldiers of empire I went back to some research that I had done before on Canada’s Expeditionary Force. Like the forces described on Olusoga’s book, Canada’s image of the war is now largely focused on those of European descent; soldiers with ties to England and the British Empire who later wrote memoirs and in many cases defined the way that we, 100 years later, think of Canada’s war. As we now increasingly know, Canada’s army was not just made up of those with connections to England; it was actually a varied force, drawing from all members of contemporary Canadian society, many of whose stories have been lost until only just recently.  Continue reading “The world at war: Canada’s multi-origin CEF”