The Liberation of Mons and the Signing of the Armistice

The hundred days campaign had forced the German army into full retreat. German morale hit a new low as death, starvation, and sickness eroded motivation to carry on. Nevertheless, German rear-guards continued to show strong pockets of resistance as it retreated towards the city of Mons. On 7 November, the Canadian Corps crossed into Belgium and on 10 November they began their encirclement of Mons in their final battle to recapture a city that had been under German occupation since 1914. Continue reading “The Liberation of Mons and the Signing of the Armistice”

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“In Flanders fields”: Poppies and the tradition of remembrance

[Canada] "If ye break faith", Frank Lucien Nicolet. [1918]. Courtesy McMaster University Libraries, Identifier: 00001805
[Canada] “If ye break faith”, Frank Lucien Nicolet. [1918]. Courtesy McMaster University Libraries, Identifier: 00001805
We in Canada are used to seeing poppies on lapels this time of year. It’s a immediate signal that Remembrance Day is near, and that the time of commemorative activities has begun. On this Remembrance Day, I  would like to take a moment to write about why the poppy gain significance in the 20th century, and how it has become a symbol of commemoration throughout North American and the Commonwealth.  Continue reading ““In Flanders fields”: Poppies and the tradition of remembrance”