“Pro patria mori”: The McGill University Companies

I recently attended a lecture by historian Tim Cook on the legacy of Vimy, held at McGill. One thing that Dr. Cook mentioned was how closely entwined McGill’s history is with that the First World War, and how many buildings, plaques, and windows can be found around the campus that make reference to those from the school killed in the war. In total, over 3 000 McGill students and staff volunteered to fight overseas, of those, 363 did not return.  Continue reading ““Pro patria mori”: The McGill University Companies”

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A map to nowhere: Observation and mapping in the First World War

Sketch made afternoon Mar 22 1917 |Lorette Spur [map, 1917] R.R.Layte Fonds. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2015.05.13.06
Sketch made afternoon Mar 22 1917 |Lorette Spur [map, 1917] R.R.Layte Fonds. Collections CCGW/CCGG 2015.05.13.06
Finding one’s way around is a constant preoccupation in memoirs of the First World War. James Robert Johnston of the 14th Machine Gun Company horse transport wrote “two of us with pack horses went up almost to the ridge (Vimy) and once got lost. (This seems to be an old habit of mine, getting lost, but I guess most everyone else had the same trouble.)” [Riding into war, 42]. Continue reading “A map to nowhere: Observation and mapping in the First World War”